Popular English Dog Breeds

Bulldog

Bulldogs date all the way back to the thirteenth century in England. They were employed for the blood sport of bullbaiting, in which a pack of dogs would battle a staked bull, thanks to their muscular build.

Bulldog

When dog fighting was outlawed in the 1800s, bulldogs were utilised in the illicit trade. It was also crossed with other terrier breeds.

Beagle

English hunters in the 1500s used both big hounds hunting deer and little hounds for rabbits. They were the ancestors of beagles.

Beagle

And by the 1800s, these little hounds were being bred for their pleasant looks as much as their hunting abilities.

Yorkshire Terrier

The Yorkshire terrier has roots that go back to the 1800s in the English counties of Yorkshire and Lancashire. It is believed to be a cross between the Skye and Dandie Dinmont, two Scottish terrier breeds.

Yorkshire Terrier

It might also contain some Maltese. Particularly in coal mines and textile mills, early Yorkies were employed as rodent killers. However, they swiftly grabbed the elite's affections as well, emerging as coveted lapdogs.

English Springer Spaniel

Both "cocker" and "springer" spaniels, the ancestors of the modern spaniel breeds, may be born in the same litter for generations in England.

English Springer Spaniel

For hunters, the larger springers were used to "spring" or flush birds and other game out of hiding places.

Bullmastiff

Poachers targeted English nobles' country estates in the 1800s. A large, athletic, and brave dog that could capture and imprison any intruding poacher was created in response.

Bullmastiff

Bullmastiff refers to the breed of dog that was a cross between a bulldog and a mastiff. Although it was huge and menacing, it was also intelligent and obedient enough to obey orders. Even in modern times, bullmastiffs might be wary of strangers.

Airedale Terrier

The Aire Valley in northern England is the origin of Airedale terriers. These huge terriers were raised in the 1800s by industrial and mill workers to be shrewd, hardy, and brave hunting dogs.

Airedale Terrier

The otterhound, several terrier varieties, and possibly setters, retrievers, and herders were all components of the Airedale. This resulted in a versatile dog that was proficient with both land-based and aquatic game.

Whippet

Coal workers in England aspired to participate in dog racing and hunting in the 1800s. They were unable to afford to keep large dogs like the greyhound, though.

Whippet

So they produced a smaller dog that was equally adept at hunting and athletics. The quick little whippet was probably created by breeding small, quick terriers with greyhounds.

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